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Version: 1.8.1

Operators (D to H)


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Definition

Operators in the GAML language are used to compose complex expressions. An operator performs a function on one, two, or n operands (which are other expressions and thus may be themselves composed of operators) and returns the result of this function.

Most of them use a classical prefixed functional syntax (i.e. operator_name(operand1, operand2, operand3), see below), with the exception of arithmetic (e.g. +, /), logical (and, or), comparison (e.g. >, <), access (., [..]) and pair (::) operators, which require an infixed notation (i.e. operand1 operator_symbol operand1).

The ternary functional if-else operator, ? :, uses a special infixed syntax composed with two symbols (e.g. operand1 ? operand2 : operand3). Two unary operators (- and !) use a traditional prefixed syntax that does not require parentheses unless the operand is itself a complex expression (e.g. - 10, ! (operand1 or operand2)).

Finally, special constructor operators ({...} for constructing points, [...] for constructing lists and maps) will require their operands to be placed between their two symbols (e.g. {1,2,3}, [operand1, operand2, ..., operandn] or [key1::value1, key2::value2... keyn::valuen]).

With the exception of these special cases above, the following rules apply to the syntax of operators:

  • if they only have one operand, the functional prefixed syntax is mandatory (e.g. operator_name(operand1))
  • if they have two arguments, either the functional prefixed syntax (e.g. operator_name(operand1, operand2)) or the infixed syntax (e.g. operand1 operator_name operand2) can be used.
  • if they have more than two arguments, either the functional prefixed syntax (e.g. operator_name(operand1, operand2, ..., operand)) or a special infixed syntax with the first operand on the left-hand side of the operator name (e.g. operand1 operator_name(operand2, ..., operand)) can be used.

All of these alternative syntaxes are completely equivalent.

Operators in GAML are purely functional, i.e. they are guaranteed to not have any side effects on their operands. For instance, the shuffle operator, which randomizes the positions of elements in a list, does not modify its list operand but returns a new shuffled list.


Priority between operators

The priority of operators determines, in the case of complex expressions composed of several operators, which one(s) will be evaluated first.

GAML follows in general the traditional priorities attributed to arithmetic, boolean, comparison operators, with some twists. Namely:

  • the constructor operators, like ::, used to compose pairs of operands, have the lowest priority of all operators (e.g. a > b :: b > c will return a pair of boolean values, which means that the two comparisons are evaluated before the operator applies. Similarly, [a > 10, b > 5] will return a list of boolean values.
  • it is followed by the ?: operator, the functional if-else (e.g. a > b ? a + 10 : a - 10 will return the result of the if-else).
  • next are the logical operators, and and or (e.g. a > b or b > c will return the value of the test)
  • next are the comparison operators (i.e. >, <, <=, >=, =, !=)
  • next the arithmetic operators in their logical order (multiplicative operators have a higher priority than additive operators)
  • next the unary operators - and !
  • next the access operators . and [] (e.g. {1,2,3}.x > 20 + {4,5,6}.y will return the result of the comparison between the x and y ordinates of the two points)
  • and finally the functional operators, which have the highest priority of all.

Using actions as operators

Actions defined in species can be used as operators, provided they are called on the correct agent. The syntax is that of normal functional operators, but the agent that will perform the action must be added as the first operand.

For instance, if the following species is defined:

species spec1 {
int min(int x, int y) {
return x > y ? x : y;
}
}

Any agent instance of spec1 can use min as an operator (if the action conflicts with an existing operator, a warning will be emitted). For instance, in the same model, the following line is perfectly acceptable:

global {
init {
create spec1;
spec1 my_agent <- spec1[0];
int the_min <- my_agent min(10,20); // or min(my_agent, 10, 20);
}
}

If the action doesn't have any operands, the syntax to use is my_agent the_action(). Finally, if it does not return a value, it might still be used but is considering as returning a value of type unknown (e.g. unknown result <- my_agent the_action(op1, op2);).

Note that due to the fact that actions are written by modelers, the general functional contract is not respected in that case: actions might perfectly have side effects on their operands (including the agent).


Table of Contents


Operators by categories


3D

box, cone3D, cube, cylinder, dem, hexagon, pyramid, set_z, sphere, teapot,


Arithmetic operators

-, /, ^, *, +, abs, acos, asin, atan, atan2, ceil, cos, cos_rad, div, even, exp, fact, floor, hypot, is_finite, is_number, ln, log, mod, round, signum, sin, sin_rad, sqrt, tan, tan_rad, tanh, with_precision,


BDI

add_values, and, eval_when, get_about, get_agent, get_agent_cause, get_belief_op, get_belief_with_name_op, get_beliefs_op, get_beliefs_with_name_op, get_current_intention_op, get_decay, get_desire_op, get_desire_with_name_op, get_desires_op, get_desires_with_name_op, get_dominance, get_familiarity, get_ideal_op, get_ideal_with_name_op, get_ideals_op, get_ideals_with_name_op, get_intensity, get_intention_op, get_intention_with_name_op, get_intentions_op, get_intentions_with_name_op, get_lifetime, get_liking, get_modality, get_obligation_op, get_obligation_with_name_op, get_obligations_op, get_obligations_with_name_op, get_plan_name, get_predicate, get_solidarity, get_strength, get_super_intention, get_trust, get_truth, get_uncertainties_op, get_uncertainties_with_name_op, get_uncertainty_op, get_uncertainty_with_name_op, get_values, has_belief_op, has_belief_with_name_op, has_desire_op, has_desire_with_name_op, has_ideal_op, has_ideal_with_name_op, has_intention_op, has_intention_with_name_op, has_obligation_op, has_obligation_with_name_op, has_uncertainty_op, has_uncertainty_with_name_op, new_emotion, new_mental_state, new_predicate, new_social_link, not, or, set_about, set_agent, set_agent_cause, set_decay, set_dominance, set_familiarity, set_intensity, set_lifetime, set_liking, set_modality, set_predicate, set_solidarity, set_strength, set_trust, set_truth, with_values,


Casting operators

as, as_int, as_matrix, font, is, is_skill, list_with, matrix_with, species, to_gaml, topology,


-, /, *, +, blend, brewer_colors, brewer_palettes, grayscale, hsb, mean, median, rgb, rnd_color, sum,


Comparison operators

!=, <, <=, =, >, >=, between,


-, ::, +, accumulate, all_match, among, at, collect, contains, contains_all, contains_any, contains_key, count, distinct, empty, every, first, first_with, get, group_by, in, index_by, inter, interleave, internal_at, internal_integrated_value, last, last_with, length, max, max_of, mean, mean_of, median, min, min_of, mul, none_matches, one_matches, one_of, product_of, range, reverse, shuffle, sort_by, split, split_in, split_using, sum, sum_of, union, variance_of, where, with_max_of, with_min_of,


-, !=, +, <, <=, =, >, >=, after, before, between, every, milliseconds_between, minus_days, minus_hours, minus_minutes, minus_months, minus_ms, minus_weeks, minus_years, months_between, plus_days, plus_hours, plus_minutes, plus_months, plus_ms, plus_weeks, plus_years, since, to, until, years_between,


Dates


Displays

horizontal, stack, vertical,


Driving operators

as_driving_graph,


edge

edge_between, strahler,


diff, diff2,


crs, csv_file, dxf_file, evaluate_sub_model, file_exists, folder, folder_exists, gaml_file, geojson_file, get, gif_file, gml_file, grid_file, image_file, is_csv, is_dxf, is_gaml, is_geojson, is_gif, is_gml, is_grid, is_image, is_json, is_obj, is_osm, is_pgm, is_property, is_R, is_saved_simulation, is_shape, is_svg, is_text, is_threeds, is_xml, json_file, new_folder, obj_file, osm_file, pgm_file, property_file, R_file, read, saved_simulation_file, shape_file, step_sub_model, svg_file, text_file, threeds_file, writable, xml_file,


conversation, message,


GamaMetaType

type_of,


add_edge, add_node, adjacency, agent_from_geometry, all_pairs_shortest_path, alpha_index, as_distance_graph, as_edge_graph, as_intersection_graph, as_path, beta_index, betweenness_centrality, biggest_cliques_of, connected_components_of, connectivity_index, contains_edge, contains_vertex, degree_of, directed, edge, edge_between, edge_betweenness, edges, gamma_index, generate_barabasi_albert, generate_complete_graph, generate_watts_strogatz, grid_cells_to_graph, in_degree_of, in_edges_of, layout_circle, layout_force, layout_grid, load_graph_from_file, load_shortest_paths, main_connected_component, max_flow_between, maximal_cliques_of, nb_cycles, neighbors_of, node, nodes, out_degree_of, out_edges_of, path_between, paths_between, predecessors_of, remove_node_from, rewire_n, source_of, spatial_graph, strahler, successors_of, sum, target_of, undirected, use_cache, weight_of, with_optimizer_type, with_weights,


as_4_grid, as_grid, as_hexagonal_grid, grid_at, path_between,


Iterator operators

accumulate, all_match, as_map, collect, count, create_map, first_with, frequency_of, group_by, index_by, last_with, max_of, mean_of, min_of, none_matches, one_matches, product_of, sort_by, sum_of, variance_of, where, with_max_of, with_min_of,


all_indexes_of, copy_between, index_of, last_index_of,


Logical operators

:, !, ?, add_3Dmodel, add_geometry, add_icon, and, or, xor,


Map comparaison operators

fuzzy_kappa, fuzzy_kappa_sim, kappa, kappa_sim, percent_absolute_deviation,


as_map, create_map, index_of, last_index_of,


Material

material,


-, /, ., *, +, append_horizontally, append_vertically, column_at, columns_list, determinant, eigenvalues, index_of, inverse, last_index_of, row_at, rows_list, shuffle, trace, transpose,


multicriteria operators

electre_DM, evidence_theory_DM, fuzzy_choquet_DM, promethee_DM, weighted_means_DM,


agent_from_geometry, all_pairs_shortest_path, as_path, load_shortest_paths, max_flow_between, path_between, path_to, paths_between, use_cache,


-, /, *, +, <, <=, >, >=, add_point, angle_between, any_location_in, centroid, closest_points_with, farthest_point_to, grid_at, norm, points_along, points_at, points_on,


Random operators

binomial, flip, gamma_density, gamma_rnd, gamma_trunc_rnd, gauss, lognormal_density, lognormal_rnd, lognormal_trunc_rnd, open_simplex_generator, poisson, rnd, rnd_choice, sample, shuffle, simplex_generator, skew_gauss, truncated_gauss, weibull_density, weibull_rnd, weibull_trunc_rnd,


ReverseOperators

restore_simulation, restore_simulation_from_file, save_agent, save_simulation, serialize, serialize_agent,


Shape

arc, box, circle, cone, cone3D, cross, cube, curve, cylinder, ellipse, elliptical_arc, envelope, geometry_collection, hexagon, line, link, plan, polygon, polyhedron, pyramid, rectangle, sphere, square, squircle, teapot, triangle,


Spatial operators

-, *, +, add_point, agent_closest_to, agent_farthest_to, agents_at_distance, agents_inside, agents_overlapping, angle_between, any_location_in, arc, around, as_4_grid, as_grid, as_hexagonal_grid, at_distance, at_location, box, centroid, circle, clean, clean_network, closest_points_with, closest_to, cone, cone3D, convex_hull, covers, cross, crosses, crs, CRS_transform, cube, curve, cylinder, dem, direction_between, disjoint_from, distance_between, distance_to, ellipse, elliptical_arc, envelope, farthest_point_to, farthest_to, geometry_collection, gini, hexagon, hierarchical_clustering, IDW, inside, inter, intersects, inverse_rotation, line, link, masked_by, moran, neighbors_at, neighbors_of, normalized_rotation, overlapping, overlaps, partially_overlaps, path_between, path_to, plan, points_along, points_at, points_on, polygon, polyhedron, pyramid, rectangle, rotated_by, rotation_composition, round, scaled_to, set_z, simple_clustering_by_distance, simplification, skeletonize, smooth, sphere, split_at, split_geometry, split_lines, square, squircle, teapot, to_GAMA_CRS, to_rectangles, to_segments, to_squares, to_sub_geometries, touches, towards, transformed_by, translated_by, triangle, triangulate, union, using, voronoi, with_precision, without_holes,


Spatial properties operators

covers, crosses, intersects, partially_overlaps, touches,


Spatial queries operators

agent_closest_to, agent_farthest_to, agents_at_distance, agents_inside, agents_overlapping, at_distance, closest_to, farthest_to, inside, neighbors_at, neighbors_of, overlapping,


Spatial relations operators

direction_between, distance_between, distance_to, path_between, path_to, towards,


Spatial statistical operators

hierarchical_clustering, simple_clustering_by_distance,


Spatial transformations operators

-, *, +, as_4_grid, as_grid, as_hexagonal_grid, at_location, clean, clean_network, convex_hull, CRS_transform, inverse_rotation, normalized_rotation, rotated_by, rotation_composition, scaled_to, simplification, skeletonize, smooth, split_geometry, split_lines, to_GAMA_CRS, to_rectangles, to_segments, to_squares, to_sub_geometries, transformed_by, translated_by, triangulate, voronoi, with_precision, without_holes,


index_of, last_index_of, of_generic_species, of_species,


Statistical operators

auto_correlation, beta, binomial_coeff, binomial_complemented, binomial_sum, build, chi_square, chi_square_complemented, corR, correlation, covariance, dbscan, distribution_of, distribution2d_of, dtw, durbin_watson, frequency_of, gamma, gamma_distribution, gamma_distribution_complemented, geometric_mean, gini, harmonic_mean, hierarchical_clustering, incomplete_beta, incomplete_gamma, incomplete_gamma_complement, kmeans, kurtosis, kurtosis, log_gamma, max, mean, mean_deviation, meanR, median, min, moment, moran, mul, normal_area, normal_density, normal_inverse, predict, pValue_for_fStat, pValue_for_tStat, quantile, quantile_inverse, rank_interpolated, rms, simple_clustering_by_distance, skew, skewness, split, split_in, split_using, standard_deviation, student_area, student_t_inverse, sum, variance, variance,


+, <, <=, >, >=, at, char, contains, contains_all, contains_any, copy_between, date, empty, first, in, indented_by, index_of, is_number, last, last_index_of, length, lower_case, replace, replace_regex, reverse, sample, shuffle, split_with, string, upper_case,


SubModel

load_sub_model,


System

., choose, command, copy, copy_to_clipboard, dead, enter, eval_gaml, every, is_error, is_warning, user_input,


date, string,


action, agent, attributes, BDIPlan, bool, container, emotion, file, float, gaml_type, geometry, graph, int, kml, list, map, material, matrix, mental_state, Norm, pair, path, point, predicate, regression, rgb, Sanction, skill, social_link, topology, unknown,


User control operators

choose, enter, user_input,


Operators


date

Possible use:

  • string date string ---> date
  • date (string , string) ---> date
  • date (string, string, string) ---> date

Result:

converts a string to a date following a custom pattern. The pattern can use "%Y %M %N %D %E %h %m %s %z" for outputting years, months, name of month, days, name of days, hours, minutes, seconds and the time-zone. A null or empty pattern will parse the date using one of the ISO date & time formats (similar to date('...') in that case). The pattern can also follow the pattern definition found here, which gives much more control over what will be parsed: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/time/format/DateTimeFormatter.html#patterns. Different patterns are available by default as constant: #iso_local, #iso_simple, #iso_offset, #iso_zoned and #custom, which can be changed in the preferences converts a string to a date following a custom pattern and a specific locale (e.g. 'fr', 'en'...). The pattern can use "%Y %M %N %D %E %h %m %s %z" for parsing years, months, name of month, days, name of days, hours, minutes, seconds and the time-zone. A null or empty pattern will parse the date using one of the ISO date & time formats (similar to date('...') in that case). The pattern can also follow the pattern definition found here, which gives much more control over what will be parsed: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/time/format/DateTimeFormatter.html#patterns. Different patterns are available by default as constant: #iso_local, #iso_simple, #iso_offset, #iso_zoned and #custom, which can be changed in the preferences

Examples:

 
date den <- date("1999-12-30", 'yyyy-MM-dd');
date d <- date("1999-january-30", 'yyyy-MMMM-dd', 'en');


dbscan

Possible use:

  • dbscan (list, float, int) ---> list<list>

Result:

returns the list of clusters (list of instance indices) computed with the dbscan (density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise) algorithm from the first operand data according to the maximum radius of the neighborhood to be considered (eps) and the minimum number of points needed for a cluster (minPts). Usage: dbscan(data,eps,minPoints)

Special cases:

  • if the lengths of two vectors in the right-hand aren't equal, returns 0

Examples:

 
list<list> var0 <- dbscan ([[2,4,5], [3,8,2], [1,1,3], [4,3,4]],10,2); // var0 equals [[0,1,2,3]]


dead

Possible use:

  • dead (agent) ---> bool

Result:

true if the agent is dead (or null), false otherwise.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- dead(agent_A); // var0 equals true or false


degree_of

Possible use:

  • graph degree_of unknown ---> int
  • degree_of (graph , unknown) ---> int

Result:

returns the degree (in+out) of a vertex (right-hand operand) in the graph given as left-hand operand.

Examples:

 
int var1 <- graphFromMap degree_of (node(3)); // var1 equals 3

See also:

in_degree_of, out_degree_of,


dem

Possible use:

  • dem (file) ---> geometry
  • file dem file ---> geometry
  • dem (file , file) ---> geometry
  • file dem float ---> geometry
  • dem (file , float) ---> geometry
  • dem (file, file, float) ---> geometry

Result:

A polygon that is equivalent to the surface of the texture

Examples:

 
geometry var0 <- dem(dem,texture); // var0 equals a geometry as a rectangle of weight and height equal to the texture.
geometry var1 <- dem(dem,texture,z_factor); // var1 equals a geometry as a rectangle of width and height equal to the texture.
geometry var2 <- dem(dem,z_factor); // var2 equals a geometry as a rectangle of weight and height equal to the texture.
geometry var3 <- dem(dem); // var3 equals returns a geometry as a rectangle of width and height equal to the texture.


det

Same signification as determinant


determinant

Possible use:

  • determinant (matrix<unknown>) ---> float

Result:

The determinant of the given matrix

Examples:

 
float var0 <- determinant(matrix([[1,2],[3,4]])); // var0 equals -2


diff

Possible use:

  • float diff float ---> float
  • diff (float , float) ---> float

Result:

A placeholder function for expressing equations


diff2

Possible use:

  • float diff2 float ---> float
  • diff2 (float , float) ---> float

Result:

A placeholder function for expressing equations


directed

Possible use:

  • directed (graph) ---> graph

Result:

the operand graph becomes a directed graph.

Comment:

WARNING / side effect: this operator modifies the operand and does not create a new graph.

See also:

undirected,


direction_between

Possible use:

  • topology direction_between container<unknown,geometry> ---> float
  • direction_between (topology , container<unknown,geometry>) ---> float

Result:

A direction (in degree) between a list of two geometries (geometries, agents, points) considering a topology.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- my_topology direction_between [ag1, ag2]; // var0 equals the direction between ag1 and ag2 considering the topology my_topology

See also:

towards, direction_to, distance_to, distance_between, path_between, path_to,


direction_to

Same signification as towards


disjoint_from

Possible use:

  • geometry disjoint_from geometry ---> bool
  • disjoint_from (geometry , geometry) ---> bool

Result:

A boolean, equal to true if the left-geometry (or agent/point) is disjoints from the right-geometry (or agent/point).

Special cases:

  • if one of the operand is null, returns true.
  • if one operand is a point, returns false if the point is included in the geometry.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- polyline([{10,10},{20,20}]) disjoint_from polyline([{15,15},{25,25}]); // var0 equals false
bool var1 <- polygon([{10,10},{10,20},{20,20},{20,10}]) disjoint_from polygon([{15,15},{15,25},{25,25},{25,15}]); // var1 equals false
bool var2 <- polygon([{10,10},{10,20},{20,20},{20,10}]) disjoint_from {15,15}; // var2 equals false
bool var3 <- polygon([{10,10},{10,20},{20,20},{20,10}]) disjoint_from {25,25}; // var3 equals true
bool var4 <- polygon([{10,10},{10,20},{20,20},{20,10}]) disjoint_from polygon([{35,35},{35,45},{45,45},{45,35}]); // var4 equals true

See also:

intersects, crosses, overlaps, partially_overlaps, touches,


distance_between

Possible use:

  • topology distance_between container<unknown,geometry> ---> float
  • distance_between (topology , container<unknown,geometry>) ---> float

Result:

A distance between a list of geometries (geometries, agents, points) considering a topology.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- my_topology distance_between [ag1, ag2, ag3]; // var0 equals the distance between ag1, ag2 and ag3 considering the topology my_topology

See also:

towards, direction_to, distance_to, direction_between, path_between, path_to,


distance_to

Possible use:

  • geometry distance_to geometry ---> float
  • distance_to (geometry , geometry) ---> float
  • point distance_to point ---> float
  • distance_to (point , point) ---> float

Result:

A distance between two geometries (geometries, agents or points) considering the topology of the agent applying the operator.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- ag1 distance_to ag2; // var0 equals the distance between ag1 and ag2 considering the topology of the agent applying the operator

See also:

towards, direction_to, distance_between, direction_between, path_between, path_to,


distinct

Possible use:

  • distinct (container) ---> list

Result:

produces a set from the elements of the operand (i.e. a list without duplicated elements)

Special cases:

  • if the operand is a graph, remove_duplicates returns the set of nodes
  • if the operand is nil, remove_duplicates returns nil
 
list var1 <- remove_duplicates([]); // var1 equals []
  • if the operand is a map, remove_duplicates returns the set of values without duplicate
 
list var2 <- remove_duplicates([1::3,2::4,3::3,5::7]); // var2 equals [3,4,7]
  • if the operand is a matrix, remove_duplicates returns a list containing all the elments with duplicated.
 
list var3 <- remove_duplicates([["c11","c12","c13","c13"],["c21","c22","c23","c23"]]); // var3 equals [["c11","c12","c13","c21","c22","c23"]]

Examples:

 
list var0 <- remove_duplicates([3,2,5,1,2,3,5,5,5]); // var0 equals [3,2,5,1]


distribution_of

Possible use:

  • distribution_of (container) ---> map
  • container distribution_of int ---> map
  • distribution_of (container , int) ---> map
  • distribution_of (container, int, float, float) ---> map

Result:

Discretize a list of values into n bins (computes the bins from a numerical variable into n (default 10) bins. Returns a distribution map with the values (values key), the interval legends (legend key), the distribution parameters (params keys, for cumulative charts). Parameters can be (list), (list, nbbins) or (list,nbbins,valmin,valmax)

Examples:

 
map var0 <- distribution_of([1,1,2,12.5],10); // var0 equals map(['values'::[2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],'legend'::['[0.0:2.0]','[2.0:4.0]','[4.0:6.0]','[6.0:8.0]','[8.0:10.0]','[10.0:12.0]','[12.0:14.0]','[14.0:16.0]','[16.0:18.0]','[18.0:20.0]'],'parlist'::[1,0]])
map var1 <- distribution_of([1,1,2,12.5]); // var1 equals map(['values'::[2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],'legend'::['[0.0:2.0]','[2.0:4.0]','[4.0:6.0]','[6.0:8.0]','[8.0:10.0]','[10.0:12.0]','[12.0:14.0]','[14.0:16.0]','[16.0:18.0]','[18.0:20.0]'],'parlist'::[1,0]])
map var2 <- distribution_of([1,1,2,12.5]); // var2 equals map(['values'::[2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],'legend'::['[0.0:2.0]','[2.0:4.0]','[4.0:6.0]','[6.0:8.0]','[8.0:10.0]','[10.0:12.0]','[12.0:14.0]','[14.0:16.0]','[16.0:18.0]','[18.0:20.0]'],'parlist'::[1,0]])

See also:

as_map,


distribution2d_of

Possible use:

  • container distribution2d_of container ---> map
  • distribution2d_of (container , container) ---> map
  • distribution2d_of (container, container, int, int) ---> map
  • distribution2d_of (container, container, int, float, float, int, float, float) ---> map

Result:

Discretize two lists of values into n bins (computes the bins from a numerical variable into n (default 10) bins. Returns a distribution map with the values (values key), the interval legends (legend key), the distribution parameters (params keys, for cumulative charts). Parameters can be (list), (list, nbbins) or (list,nbbins,valmin,valmax)

Examples:

 
map var0 <- distribution2d_of([1,1,2,12.5]); // var0 equals map(['values'::[2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],'legend'::['[0.0:2.0]','[2.0:4.0]','[4.0:6.0]','[6.0:8.0]','[8.0:10.0]','[10.0:12.0]','[12.0:14.0]','[14.0:16.0]','[16.0:18.0]','[18.0:20.0]'],'parlist'::[1,0]])
map var1 <- distribution2d_of([1,1,2,12.5],10); // var1 equals map(['values'::[2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],'legend'::['[0.0:2.0]','[2.0:4.0]','[4.0:6.0]','[6.0:8.0]','[8.0:10.0]','[10.0:12.0]','[12.0:14.0]','[14.0:16.0]','[16.0:18.0]','[18.0:20.0]'],'parlist'::[1,0]])
map var2 <- distribution2d_of([1,1,2,12.5],10); // var2 equals map(['values'::[2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],'legend'::['[0.0:2.0]','[2.0:4.0]','[4.0:6.0]','[6.0:8.0]','[8.0:10.0]','[10.0:12.0]','[12.0:14.0]','[14.0:16.0]','[16.0:18.0]','[18.0:20.0]'],'parlist'::[1,0]])

See also:

as_map,


div

Possible use:

  • int div float ---> int
  • div (int , float) ---> int
  • float div float ---> int
  • div (float , float) ---> int
  • int div int ---> int
  • div (int , int) ---> int
  • float div int ---> int
  • div (float , int) ---> int

Result:

Returns the truncation of the division of the left-hand operand by the right-hand operand.

Special cases:

  • if the right-hand operand is equal to zero, raises an exception.
  • if the right-hand operand is equal to zero, raises an exception.
  • if the right-hand operand is equal to zero, raises an exception.

Examples:

 
int var0 <- 40 div 4.1; // var0 equals 9
int var1 <- 40.1 div 4.5; // var1 equals 8
int var2 <- 40 div 3; // var2 equals 13
int var3 <- 40.5 div 3; // var3 equals 13

See also:

mod,


dnorm

Same signification as normal_density


dtw

Possible use:

  • list dtw list ---> float
  • dtw (list , list) ---> float
  • dtw (list, list, int) ---> float

Result:

returns the dynamic time warping between the two series of values (step pattern used: symetric1) returns the dynamic time warping between the two series of values (step pattern used: symetric1) with Sakoe-Chiba band (radius: the window width of Sakoe-Chiba band)

Examples:

 
float var0 <- dtw([32.0,5.0,1.0,3.0],[1.0,10.0,5.0,1.0]); // var0 equals 38.0
float var1 <- dtw([10.0,5.0,1.0, 3.0],[1.0,10.0,5.0,1.0], 2); // var1 equals 11.0


durbin_watson

Possible use:

  • durbin_watson (container) ---> float

Result:

Durbin-Watson computation

Examples:

 
float var0 <- durbin_watson([13,2,1,4,1,2]) with_precision(4); // var0 equals 0.7231


dxf_file

Possible use:

  • dxf_file (string) ---> file
  • string dxf_file float ---> file
  • dxf_file (string , float) ---> file

Result:

Constructs a file of type dxf. Allowed extensions are limited to dxf

Special cases:

  • dxf_file(string): This file constructor allows to read a dxf (.dxf) file
 
file f <- dxf_file("file.dxf");
  • dxf_file(string,float): This file constructor allows to read a dxf (.dxf) file and specify the unit (meter by default)
 
file f <- dxf_file("file.dxf",#m);

See also:

is_dxf,


edge

Possible use:

  • edge (pair) ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown) ---> unknown
  • pair edge float ---> unknown
  • edge (pair , float) ---> unknown
  • unknown edge float ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown , float) ---> unknown
  • unknown edge unknown ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown , unknown) ---> unknown
  • unknown edge int ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown , int) ---> unknown
  • pair edge int ---> unknown
  • edge (pair , int) ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown, unknown, int) ---> unknown
  • edge (pair, unknown, int) ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown, unknown, float) ---> unknown
  • edge (pair, unknown, float) ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown, unknown, unknown) ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown, unknown, unknown, float) ---> unknown
  • edge (unknown, unknown, unknown, int) ---> unknown

edge_between

Possible use:

  • graph edge_between pair ---> unknown
  • edge_between (graph , pair) ---> unknown

Result:

returns the edge linking two nodes

Examples:

 
unknown var0 <- graphFromMap edge_between node1::node2; // var0 equals edge1

See also:

out_edges_of, in_edges_of,


edge_betweenness

Possible use:

  • edge_betweenness (graph) ---> map

Result:

returns a map containing for each edge (key), its betweenness centrality (value): number of shortest paths passing through each edge

Examples:

 
graph graphEpidemio <- graph([]);
map var1 <- edge_betweenness(graphEpidemio); // var1 equals the edge betweenness index of the graph


edges

Possible use:

  • edges (container) ---> container

eigenvalues

Possible use:

  • eigenvalues (matrix<unknown>) ---> list<float>

Result:

The eigen values (matrix) of the given matrix

Examples:

 
list<float> var0 <- eigenvalues(matrix([[5,-3],[6,-4]])); // var0 equals [2.0000000000000004,-0.9999999999999998]


electre_DM

Possible use:

  • electre_DM (list<list>, list<map<string,unknown>>, float) ---> int

Result:

The index of the best candidate according to a method based on the ELECTRE methods. The principle of the ELECTRE methods is to compare the possible candidates by pair. These methods analyses the possible outranking relation existing between two candidates. An candidate outranks another if this one is at least as good as the other one. The ELECTRE methods are based on two concepts: the concordance and the discordance. The concordance characterizes the fact that, for an outranking relation to be validated, a sufficient majority of criteria should be in favor of this assertion. The discordance characterizes the fact that, for an outranking relation to be validated, none of the criteria in the minority should oppose too strongly this assertion. These two conditions must be true for validating the outranking assertion. More information about the ELECTRE methods can be found in [http://www.springerlink.com/content/g367r44322876223/ Figueira, J., Mousseau, V., Roy, B.: ELECTRE Methods. In: Figueira, J., Greco, S., and Ehrgott, M., (Eds.), Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis: State of the Art Surveys, Springer, New York, 133--162 (2005)]. The first operand is the list of candidates (a candidate is a list of criterion values); the second operand the list of criterion: A criterion is a map that contains fives elements: a name, a weight, a preference value (p), an indifference value (q) and a veto value (v). The preference value represents the threshold from which the difference between two criterion values allows to prefer one vector of values over another. The indifference value represents the threshold from which the difference between two criterion values is considered significant. The veto value represents the threshold from which the difference between two criterion values disqualifies the candidate that obtained the smaller value; the last operand is the fuzzy cut.

Special cases:

  • returns -1 is the list of candidates is nil or empty

Examples:

 
int var0 <- electre_DM([[1.0, 7.0],[4.0,2.0],[3.0, 3.0]], [["name"::"utility", "weight" :: 2.0,"p"::0.5, "q"::0.0, "s"::1.0, "maximize" :: true],["name"::"price", "weight" :: 1.0,"p"::0.5, "q"::0.0, "s"::1.0, "maximize" :: false]],0.7); // var0 equals 0

See also:

weighted_means_DM, promethee_DM, evidence_theory_DM,


ellipse

Possible use:

  • float ellipse float ---> geometry
  • ellipse (float , float) ---> geometry

Result:

An ellipse geometry which x-radius is equal to the first operand and y-radius is equal to the second operand

Comment:

the center of the ellipse is by default the location of the current agent in which has been called this operator.

Special cases:

  • returns a point if both operands are lower or equal to 0, a line if only one is.

Examples:

 
geometry var0 <- ellipse(10, 10); // var0 equals a geometry as an ellipse of width 10 and height 10.

See also:

around, cone, line, link, norm, point, polygon, polyline, rectangle, square, circle, squircle, triangle,


elliptical_arc

Possible use:

  • elliptical_arc (point, point, float, int) ---> geometry

Result:

An elliptical arc from the first operand (point) to the second operand (point), which radius is equal to the third operand, and a int giving the number of points to use as a last operand

Examples:

 
geometry var0 <- elliptical_arc({0,0},{10,10},5.0, 20); // var0 equals a geometry from {0,0} to {10,10} considering a radius of 5.0 built using 20 points

See also:

arc, around, cone, line, link, norm, point, polygon, polyline, super_ellipse, rectangle, square, circle, ellipse, triangle,


emotion

Possible use:

  • emotion (any) ---> emotion

Result:


empty

Possible use:

  • empty (container<KeyType,ValueType>) ---> bool
  • empty (string) ---> bool

Result:

true if the operand is empty, false otherwise.

Comment:

the empty operator behavior depends on the nature of the operand

Special cases:

  • if it is a map, empty returns true if the map contains no key-value mappings, and false otherwise
  • if it is a file, empty returns true if the content of the file (that is also a container) is empty, and false otherwise
  • if it is a population, empty returns true if there is no agent in the population, and false otherwise
  • if it is a graph, empty returns true if it contains no vertex and no edge, and false otherwise
  • if it is a matrix of int, float or object, it will return true if all elements are respectively 0, 0.0 or null, and false otherwise
  • if it is a matrix of geometry, it will return true if the matrix contains no cell, and false otherwise
  • if it is a list, empty returns true if there is no element in the list, and false otherwise
 
bool var0 <- empty([]); // var0 equals true
  • if it is a string, empty returns true if the string does not contain any character, and false otherwise
 
bool var1 <- empty ('abced'); // var1 equals false

enlarged_by

Same signification as +


enter

Possible use:

  • string enter bool ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string , bool) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • string enter float ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string , float) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • string enter int ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string , int) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • string enter string ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string , string) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • string enter unknown ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string , unknown) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • string enter any GAML type ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string , any GAML type) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string, any GAML type, unknown) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string, float, float, float) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string, int, int, int) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string, int, int, int, int) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter
  • enter (string, float, float, float, float) ---> msi.gama.kernel.experiment.IParameter

Result:

Allows the user to enter a boolean value by specifying a title and an initial value Allows the user to enter an int by specifying a title, an initial value, a min, a max and a step value Allows the user to enter a float by specifying a title, an initial value, a min, a max and a step value Allows the user to enter a float by specifying a title and an initial value Allows the user to enter an int by specifying a title, an initial value, a min and a max value Allows the user to enter an int by specifying a title and an initial value Allows the user to enter a string by specifying a title and an initial value Allows the user to enter a value by specifying a title and an initial value. The type will be deduced from the value Allows the user to enter a value by specifying a title, a type, and an initial value Allows the user to enter an int by specifying a title, an initial value, a min and a max value Allows the user to enter a value by specifying a title and a type


envelope

Possible use:

  • envelope (unknown) ---> geometry

Result:

A 3D geometry that represents the box that surrounds the geometries or the surface described by the arguments. More general than geometry(arguments).envelope, as it allows to pass int, double, point, image files, shape files, asc files, or any list combining these arguments, in which case the envelope will be correctly expanded. If an envelope cannot be determined from the arguments, a default one of dimensions (0,100, 0, 100, 0, 100) is returned

Special cases:

  • This operator is often used to define the environment of simulation

Examples:

 
file road_shapefile <- file("../includes/roads.shp");
geometry shape <- envelope(road_shapefile);
// shape is the system variable of the environment
geometry var3 <- polygon([{0,0}, {20,0}, {10,10}, {10,0}]); // var3 equals create a polygon to get the envolpe
float var4 <- envelope(polygon([{0,0}, {20,0}, {10,10}, {10,0}])).area; // var4 equals 200.0


eval_gaml

Possible use:

  • eval_gaml (string) ---> unknown

Result:

evaluates the given GAML string.

Examples:

 
unknown var0 <- eval_gaml("2+3"); // var0 equals 5


eval_when

Possible use:

  • eval_when (BDIPlan) ---> bool

Result:

evaluate the facet when of a given plan

Examples:

 
eval_when(plan1)


evaluate_sub_model

Possible use:

  • agent evaluate_sub_model string ---> unknown
  • evaluate_sub_model (agent , string) ---> unknown

Result:

Load a submodel

Comment:

loaded submodel


even

Possible use:

  • even (int) ---> bool

Result:

Returns true if the operand is even and false if it is odd.

Special cases:

  • if the operand is equal to 0, it returns true.
  • if the operand is a float, it is truncated before

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- even (3); // var0 equals false
bool var1 <- even(-12); // var1 equals true


every

Possible use:

  • every (any expression) ---> bool
  • every (int) ---> bool
  • list every int ---> list
  • every (list , int) ---> list
  • list every any expression ---> list<date>
  • every (list , any expression) ---> list<date>

Result:

Retrieves elements from the first argument every step (second argument) elements. Raises an error if the step is negative or equal to zero expects a frequency (expressed in seconds of simulated time) as argument. Will return true every time the current_date matches with this frequency true every operand * cycle, false otherwise applies a step to an interval of dates defined by 'date1 to date2'

Comment:

Used to do something at regular intervals of time. Can be used in conjunction with 'since', 'after', 'before', 'until' or 'between', so that this computation only takes place in the temporal segment defined by these operators. In all cases, the starting_date of the model is used as a reference starting pointthe value of the every operator depends on the cycle. It can be used to do something every x cycle.

Examples:

 
reflex when: every(2#days) since date('2000-01-01') { .. }
state a { transition to: b when: every(2#mn);} state b { transition to: a when: every(30#s);} // This oscillatory behavior will use the starting_date of the model as its starting point in time
if every(2#cycle) {write "the cycle number is even";}
else {write "the cycle number is odd";}
(date('2000-01-01') to date('2010-01-01')) every (#month) // builds an interval between these two dates which contains all the monthly dates starting from the beginning of the interval

See also:

since, after, to,


every_cycle

Same signification as every


evidence_theory_DM

Possible use:

  • list<list> evidence_theory_DM list<map<string,unknown>> ---> int
  • evidence_theory_DM (list<list> , list<map<string,unknown>>) ---> int
  • evidence_theory_DM (list<list>, list<map<string,unknown>>, bool) ---> int

Result:

The index of the best candidate according to a method based on the Evidence theory. This theory, which was proposed by Shafer ([http://www.glennshafer.com/books/amte.html Shafer G (1976) A mathematical theory of evidence, Princeton University Press]), is based on the work of Dempster ([http://projecteuclid.org/DPubS?service=UI&version=1.0&verb=Display&handle=euclid.aoms/1177698950 Dempster A (1967) Upper and lower probabilities induced by multivalued mapping. Annals of Mathematical Statistics, vol. 38, pp. 325--339]) on lower and upper probability distributions. The first operand is the list of candidates (a candidate is a list of criterion values); the second operand the list of criterion: A criterion is a map that contains seven elements: a name, a first threshold s1, a second threshold s2, a value for the assertion "this candidate is the best" at threshold s1 (v1p), a value for the assertion "this candidate is the best" at threshold s2 (v2p), a value for the assertion "this candidate is not the best" at threshold s1 (v1c), a value for the assertion "this candidate is not the best" at threshold s2 (v2c). v1p, v2p, v1c and v2c have to been defined in order that: v1p + v1c <= 1.0; v2p + v2c <= 1.0.; the last operand allows to use a simple version of this multi-criteria decision making method (simple if true)

Special cases:

  • returns -1 is the list of candidates is nil or empty
  • if the operator is used with only 2 operands (the candidates and the criteria), the last parameter (use simple method) is set to true

Examples:

 
int var0 <- evidence_theory_DM([[1.0, 7.0],[4.0,2.0],[3.0, 3.0]], [["name"::"utility", "s1" :: 0.0,"s2"::1.0, "v1p"::0.0, "v2p"::1.0, "v1c"::0.0, "v2c"::0.0, "maximize" :: true],["name"::"price", "s1" :: 0.0,"s2"::1.0, "v1p"::0.0, "v2p"::1.0, "v1c"::0.0, "v2c"::0.0, "maximize" :: true]], false); // var0 equals 0
int var1 <- evidence_theory_DM([[1.0, 7.0],[4.0,2.0],[3.0, 3.0]], [["name"::"utility", "s1" :: 0.0,"s2"::1.0, "v1p"::0.0, "v2p"::1.0, "v1c"::0.0, "v2c"::0.0, "maximize" :: true],["name"::"price", "s1" :: 0.0,"s2"::1.0, "v1p"::0.0, "v2p"::1.0, "v1c"::0.0, "v2c"::0.0, "maximize" :: true]]); // var1 equals 0

See also:

weighted_means_DM, electre_DM,


exp

Possible use:

  • exp (float) ---> float
  • exp (int) ---> float

Result:

Returns Euler's number e raised to the power of the operand.

Special cases:

  • the operand is casted to a float before being evaluated.
  • the operand is casted to a float before being evaluated.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- exp (0.0); // var0 equals 1.0

See also:

ln,


fact

Possible use:

  • fact (int) ---> float

Result:

Returns the factorial of the operand.

Special cases:

  • if the operand is less than 0, fact returns 0.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- fact(4); // var0 equals 24


farthest_point_to

Possible use:

  • geometry farthest_point_to point ---> point
  • farthest_point_to (geometry , point) ---> point

Result:

the farthest point of the left-operand to the left-point.

Examples:

 
point var0 <- geom farthest_point_to(pt); // var0 equals the farthest point of geom to pt

See also:

any_location_in, any_point_in, closest_points_with, points_at,


farthest_to

Possible use:

  • container<unknown,geometry> farthest_to geometry ---> geometry
  • farthest_to (container<unknown,geometry> , geometry) ---> geometry

Result:

An agent or a geometry among the left-operand list of agents, species or meta-population (addition of species), the farthest to the operand (casted as a geometry).

Comment:

the distance is computed in the topology of the calling agent (the agent in which this operator is used), with the distance algorithm specific to the topology.

Examples:

 
geometry var0 <- [ag1, ag2, ag3] closest_to(self); // var0 equals return the farthest agent among ag1, ag2 and ag3 to the agent applying the operator.
(species1 + species2) closest_to self

See also:

neighbors_at, neighbors_of, inside, overlapping, agents_overlapping, agents_inside, agent_closest_to, closest_to, agent_farthest_to,


file

Possible use:

  • file (any) ---> file

file_exists

Possible use:

  • file_exists (string) ---> bool

Result:

Test whether the parameter is the path to an existing file. False if it does not exist of if it is a folder

Examples:

 
string file_name <-"../includes/buildings.shp";
if file_exists(file_name){
write "File exists in the computer";
}


first

Possible use:

  • first (container<KeyType,ValueType>) ---> ValueType
  • first (string) ---> string
  • int first container ---> list
  • first (int , container) ---> list

Result:

the first value of the operand

Comment:

the first operator behavior depends on the nature of the operand

Special cases:

  • if it is a map, first returns the first value of the first pair (in insertion order)
  • if it is a file, first returns the first element of the content of the file (that is also a container)
  • if it is a population, first returns the first agent of the population
  • if it is a graph, first returns the first edge (in creation order)
  • if it is a matrix, first returns the element at {0,0} in the matrix
  • for a matrix of int or float, it will return 0 if the matrix is empty
  • for a matrix of object or geometry, it will return nil if the matrix is empty
  • if it is a list, first returns the first element of the list, or nil if the list is empty
 
int var0 <- first ([1, 2, 3]); // var0 equals 1
  • if it is a string, first returns a string composed of its first character
 
string var1 <- first ('abce'); // var1 equals 'a'

See also:

last,


first_of

Same signification as first


first_with

Possible use:

  • container first_with any expression ---> unknown
  • first_with (container , any expression) ---> unknown

Result:

the first element of the left-hand operand that makes the right-hand operand evaluate to true.

Comment:

in the right-hand operand, the keyword each can be used to represent, in turn, each of the right-hand operand elements.

Special cases:

  • if the left-hand operand is nil, first_with throws an error. If there is no element that satisfies the condition, it returns nil
  • if the left-operand is a map, the keyword each will contain each value
 
unknown var4 <- [1::2, 3::4, 5::6] first_with (each >= 4); // var4 equals 4
unknown var5 <- [1::2, 3::4, 5::6].pairs first_with (each.value >= 4); // var5 equals (3::4)

Examples:

 
unknown var0 <- [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] first_with (each > 3); // var0 equals 4
unknown var2 <- g2 first_with (length(g2 out_edges_of each) = 0); // var2 equals node9
unknown var3 <- (list(node) first_with (round(node(each).location.x) > 32); // var3 equals node2

See also:

group_by, last_with, where,


flip

Possible use:

  • flip (float) ---> bool

Result:

true or false given the probability represented by the operand

Special cases:

  • flip 0 always returns false, flip 1 true

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- flip (0.66666); // var0 equals 2/3 chances to return true.

See also:

rnd,


float

Possible use:

  • float (any) ---> float

floor

Possible use:

  • floor (float) ---> float

Result:

Maps the operand to the largest previous following integer, i.e. the largest integer not greater than x.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- floor(3); // var0 equals 3.0
float var1 <- floor(3.5); // var1 equals 3.0
float var2 <- floor(-4.7); // var2 equals -5.0

See also:

ceil, round,


folder

Possible use:

  • folder (string) ---> file

Result:

opens an existing repository

Special cases:

  • If the specified string does not refer to an existing repository, an exception is risen.

Examples:

 
file dirT <- folder("../includes/");
// dirT represents the repository "../includes/"
// dirT.contents here contains the list of the names of included files

See also:

file, new_folder,


folder_exists

Possible use:

  • folder_exists (string) ---> bool

Result:

Test whether the parameter is the path to an existing folder. False if it doesnt exist or if it is a file

Examples:

 
string file_name <-"../includes/";
if folder_exists(file_name){
write "Folder exists in the computer";
}


font

Possible use:

  • string font int ---> font
  • font (string , int) ---> font
  • font (string, int, int) ---> font

Result:

Creates a new font, by specifying its name (either a font face name like 'Lucida Grande Bold' or 'Helvetica', or a logical name like 'Dialog', 'SansSerif', 'Serif', etc.), a size in points and a style, either #bold, #italic or #plain or a combination (addition) of them. Creates a new font, by specifying its name (either a font face name like 'Lucida Grande Bold' or 'Helvetica', or a logical name like 'Dialog', 'SansSerif', 'Serif', etc.) and a size in points. No style is attached to this font

Examples:

 
font var0 <- font ('Helvetica Neue',12, #bold + #italic); // var0 equals a bold and italic face of the Helvetica Neue family


frequency_of

Possible use:

  • container frequency_of any expression ---> map
  • frequency_of (container , any expression) ---> map

Result:

Returns a map with keys equal to the application of the right-hand argument (like collect) and values equal to the frequency of this key (i.e. how many times it has been obtained)

Examples:

 
map var0 <- [1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 3, 3, 4] frequency_of each; // var0 equals map([1::1,2::1,3::4,4::3,5::1])


from

Same signification as since


fuzzy_choquet_DM

Possible use:

  • fuzzy_choquet_DM (list<list>, list<string>, map) ---> int

Result:

The index of the candidate that maximizes the Fuzzy Choquet Integral value. The first operand is the list of candidates (a candidate is a list of criterion values); the second operand the list of criterion (list of string); the third operand the weights of each sub-set of criteria (map with list for key and float for value)

Special cases:

  • returns -1 is the list of candidates is nil or empty

Examples:

 
int var0 <- fuzzy_choquet_DM([[1.0, 7.0],[4.0,2.0],[3.0, 3.0]], ["utility", "price", "size"],[["utility"]::0.5,["size"]::0.1,["price"]::0.4,["utility", "price"]::0.55]); // var0 equals 0

See also:

promethee_DM, electre_DM, evidence_theory_DM,


fuzzy_kappa

Possible use:

  • fuzzy_kappa (list<agent>, list<unknown>, list<unknown>, list<float>, list<unknown>, matrix<float>, float) ---> float
  • fuzzy_kappa (list<agent>, list<unknown>, list<unknown>, list<float>, list<unknown>, matrix<float>, float, list<unknown>) ---> float

Result:

fuzzy kappa indicator for 2 map comparisons: fuzzy_kappa(agents_list,list_vals1,list_vals2, output_similarity_per_agents,categories,fuzzy_categories_matrix, fuzzy_distance). Reference: Visser, H., and T. de Nijs, 2006. The map comparison kit, Environmental Modelling & Software, 21 fuzzy kappa indicator for 2 map comparisons: fuzzy_kappa(agents_list,list_vals1,list_vals2, output_similarity_per_agents,categories,fuzzy_categories_matrix, fuzzy_distance, weights). Reference: Visser, H., and T. de Nijs, 2006. The map comparison kit, Environmental Modelling & Software, 21

Examples:

 
fuzzy_kappa([ag1, ag2, ag3, ag4, ag5],[cat1,cat1,cat2,cat3,cat2],[cat2,cat1,cat2,cat1,cat2], similarity_per_agents,[cat1,cat2,cat3],[[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]], 2)
fuzzy_kappa([ag1, ag2, ag3, ag4, ag5],[cat1,cat1,cat2,cat3,cat2],[cat2,cat1,cat2,cat1,cat2], similarity_per_agents,[cat1,cat2,cat3],[[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]], 2, [1.0,3.0,2.0,2.0,4.0])


fuzzy_kappa_sim

Possible use:

  • fuzzy_kappa_sim (list<agent>, list<unknown>, list<unknown>, list<unknown>, list<float>, list<unknown>, matrix<float>, float) ---> float
  • fuzzy_kappa_sim (list<agent>, list<unknown>, list<unknown>, list<unknown>, list<float>, list<unknown>, matrix<float>, float, list<unknown>) ---> float

Result:

fuzzy kappa simulation indicator for 2 map comparisons: fuzzy_kappa_sim(agents_list,list_vals1,list_vals2, output_similarity_per_agents,fuzzy_transitions_matrix, fuzzy_distance, weights). Reference: Jasper van Vliet, Alex Hagen-Zanker, Jelle Hurkens, Hedwig van Delden, A fuzzy set approach to assess the predictive accuracy of land use simulations, Ecological Modelling, 24 July 2013, Pages 32-42, ISSN 0304-3800, fuzzy kappa simulation indicator for 2 map comparisons: fuzzy_kappa_sim(agents_list,list_vals1,list_vals2, output_similarity_per_agents,fuzzy_transitions_matrix, fuzzy_distance). Reference: Jasper van Vliet, Alex Hagen-Zanker, Jelle Hurkens, Hedwig van Delden, A fuzzy set approach to assess the predictive accuracy of land use simulations, Ecological Modelling, 24 July 2013, Pages 32-42, ISSN 0304-3800,

Examples:

 
fuzzy_kappa_sim([ag1, ag2, ag3, ag4, ag5], [cat1,cat1,cat2,cat3,cat2],[cat2,cat1,cat2,cat1,cat2], similarity_per_agents,[cat1,cat2,cat3],[[1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1]], 2,[1.0,3.0,2.0,2.0,4.0])
fuzzy_kappa_sim([ag1, ag2, ag3, ag4, ag5], [cat1,cat1,cat2,cat3,cat2],[cat2,cat1,cat2,cat1,cat2], similarity_per_agents,[cat1,cat2,cat3],[[1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1]], 2)


gaml_file

Possible use:

  • gaml_file (string) ---> file
  • gaml_file (string, string, string) ---> file

Result:

Constructs a file of type gaml. Allowed extensions are limited to gaml, experiment

Special cases:

  • gaml_file(string): This file constructor allows to read a gaml file (.gaml)
 
file f <- gaml_file("file.gaml");
  • gaml_file(string,string,string): This file constructor allows to compile a gaml file and run an experiment
 
file f <- gaml_file("file.gaml", "my_experiment", "my_model");

See also:

is_gaml,


gaml_type

Possible use:

  • gaml_type (any) ---> gaml_type

gamma

Possible use:

  • gamma (float) ---> float

Result:

Returns the value of the Gamma function at x.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- gamma(5); // var0 equals 24.0


gamma_density

Possible use:

  • gamma_density (float, float, float) ---> float

Result:

gamma_density(x,shape,scale) returns the probability density function (PDF) at the specified point x of the Gamma distribution with the given shape and scale.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- gamma_density(1,9,0.5); // var0 equals 0.731

See also:

binomial, gauss_rnd, lognormal_rnd, poisson, rnd, skew_gauss, truncated_gauss, weibull_rnd, weibull_density, lognormal_density,


gamma_distribution

Possible use:

  • gamma_distribution (float, float, float) ---> float

Result:

Returns the integral from zero to x of the gamma probability density function.

Comment:

incomplete_gamma(a,x) is equal to pgamma(a,1,x).

Examples:

 
float var0 <- gamma_distribution(2,3,0.9) with_precision(3); // var0 equals 0.269


gamma_distribution_complemented

Possible use:

  • gamma_distribution_complemented (float, float, float) ---> float

Result:

Returns the integral from x to infinity of the gamma probability density function.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- gamma_distribution_complemented(2,3,0.9) with_precision(3); // var0 equals 0.731


gamma_index

Possible use:

  • gamma_index (graph) ---> float

Result:

returns the gamma index of the graph (A measure of connectivity that considers the relationship between the number of observed links and the number of possible links: gamma = e/(3 * (v - 2)) - for planar graph.

Examples:

 
graph graphEpidemio <- graph([]);
float var1 <- gamma_index(graphEpidemio); // var1 equals the gamma index of the graph

See also:

alpha_index, beta_index, nb_cycles, connectivity_index,


gamma_rnd

Possible use:

  • float gamma_rnd float ---> float
  • gamma_rnd (float , float) ---> float

Result:

returns a random value from a gamma distribution with specified values of the shape and scale parameters

Examples:

 
float var0 <- gamma_rnd(9,0.5); // var0 equals 0.731

See also:

binomial, gauss_rnd, lognormal_rnd, poisson, rnd, skew_gauss, truncated_gauss, weibull_rnd, gamma_trunc_rnd,


gamma_trunc_rnd

Possible use:

  • gamma_trunc_rnd (float, float, float, bool) ---> float
  • gamma_trunc_rnd (float, float, float, float) ---> float

Result:

returns a random value from a truncated gamma distribution (in a range or given only one boundary) with specified values of the shape and scale parameters.

Special cases:

  • when 1 float and a boolean (isMax) operands are specified, the float value represents the single boundary (max if the boolean is true, min otherwise),
 
gamma_trunc_rnd(2,3,5,true)
  • when 2 float operands are specified, they are taken as mininimum and maximum values for the result
 
gamma_trunc_rnd(2,3,0,5)

See also:

gamma_rnd, weibull_trunc_rnd, lognormal_trunc_rnd, truncated_gauss,


gauss

Possible use:

  • gauss (point) ---> float
  • float gauss float ---> float
  • gauss (float , float) ---> float

Result:

A value from a normally distributed random variable with expected value (mean as first operand) and variance (standardDeviation as second operand). The probability density function of such a variable is a Gaussian. The operator can be used with an operand of type point {meand,standardDeviation}.

Special cases:

  • when standardDeviation value is 0.0, it always returns the mean value
  • when the operand is a point, it is read as {mean, standardDeviation}

Examples:

 
float var0 <- gauss(0,0.3); // var0 equals 0.22354
float var1 <- gauss({0,0.3}); // var1 equals 0.22354

See also:

binomial, gamma_rnd, lognormal_rnd, poisson, rnd, skew_gauss, truncated_gauss, weibull_rnd,


gauss_rnd

Same signification as gauss


generate_barabasi_albert

Possible use:

  • generate_barabasi_albert (container<unknown,agent>, species, int, bool) ---> graph
  • generate_barabasi_albert (species, species, int, int, bool) ---> graph

Result:

returns a random scale-free network (following Barabasi-Albert (BA) model). returns a random scale-free network (following Barabasi-Albert (BA) model).

Comment:

The Barabasi-Albert (BA) model is an algorithm for generating random scale-free networks using a preferential attachment mechanism. A scale-free network is a network whose degree distribution follows a power law, at least asymptotically.Such networks are widely observed in natural and human-made systems, including the Internet, the world wide web, citation networks, and some social networks. [From Wikipedia article]The map operand should includes following elements:The Barabasi-Albert (BA) model is an algorithm for generating random scale-free networks using a preferential attachment mechanism. A scale-free network is a network whose degree distribution follows a power law, at least asymptotically.Such networks are widely observed in natural and human-made systems, including the Internet, the world wide web, citation networks, and some social networks. [From Wikipedia article]The map operand should includes following elements:

Special cases:

  • "agents": list of existing node agents
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "size": the graph will contain (size + 1) nodes
  • "m": the number of edges added per novel node
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?
  • "vertices_specy": the species of vertices
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "size": the graph will contain (size + 1) nodes
  • "m": the number of edges added per novel node
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?

Examples:

 
graph<yourNodeSpecy,yourEdgeSpecy> graphEpidemio <- generate_barabasi_albert(
yourListOfNodes,
yourEdgeSpecy,
3,
5,
true);
graph<yourNodeSpecy,yourEdgeSpecy> graphEpidemio <- generate_barabasi_albert(
yourNodeSpecy,
yourEdgeSpecy,
3,
5,
true);

See also:

generate_watts_strogatz,


generate_complete_graph

Possible use:

  • generate_complete_graph (container<unknown,agent>, species, bool) ---> graph
  • generate_complete_graph (species, species, int, bool) ---> graph
  • generate_complete_graph (container<unknown,agent>, species, float, bool) ---> graph
  • generate_complete_graph (species, species, int, float, bool) ---> graph

Result:

returns a fully connected graph. returns a fully connected graph. returns a fully connected graph. returns a fully connected graph.

Comment:

Arguments should include following elements:Arguments should include following elements:Arguments should include following elements:Arguments should include following elements:

Special cases:

  • "vertices_specy": the species of vertices
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "size": the graph will contain size nodes.
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?
  • "agents": list of existing node agents
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?
  • "vertices_specy": the species of vertices
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "size": the graph will contain size nodes.
  • "layoutRadius": nodes of the graph will be located on a circle with radius layoutRadius and centered in the environment.
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?
  • "agents": list of existing node agents
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "layoutRadius": nodes of the graph will be located on a circle with radius layoutRadius and centered in the environment.
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?

Examples:

 
graph<myVertexSpecy,myEdgeSpecy> myGraph <- generate_complete_graph(
myVertexSpecy,
myEdgeSpecy,
10,
true);
graph<myVertexSpecy,myEdgeSpecy> myGraph <- generate_complete_graph(
myListOfNodes,
myEdgeSpecy,
true);
graph<myVertexSpecy,myEdgeSpecy> myGraph <- generate_complete_graph(
myVertexSpecy,
myEdgeSpecy,
10, 25,
true);
graph<myVertexSpecy,myEdgeSpecy> myGraph <- generate_complete_graph(
myListOfNodes,
myEdgeSpecy,
25,
true);

See also:

generate_barabasi_albert, generate_watts_strogatz,


generate_watts_strogatz

Possible use:

  • generate_watts_strogatz (container<unknown,agent>, species, float, int, bool) ---> graph
  • generate_watts_strogatz (species, species, int, float, int, bool) ---> graph

Result:

returns a random small-world network (following Watts-Strogatz model). returns a random small-world network (following Watts-Strogatz model).

Comment:

The Watts-Strogatz model is a random graph generation model that produces graphs with small-world properties, including short average path lengths and high clustering.A small-world network is a type of graph in which most nodes are not neighbors of one another, but most nodes can be reached from every other by a small number of hops or steps. [From Wikipedia article]The map operand should includes following elements:The Watts-Strogatz model is a random graph generation model that produces graphs with small-world properties, including short average path lengths and high clustering.A small-world network is a type of graph in which most nodes are not neighbors of one another, but most nodes can be reached from every other by a small number of hops or steps. [From Wikipedia article]The map operand should includes following elements:

Special cases:

  • "vertices_specy": the species of vertices
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "size": the graph will contain (size + 1) nodes. Size must be greater than k.
  • "p": probability to "rewire" an edge. So it must be between 0 and 1. The parameter is often called beta in the literature.
  • "k": the base degree of each node. k must be greater than 2 and even.
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?
  • "agents": list of existing node agents
  • "edges_species": the species of edges
  • "p": probability to "rewire" an edge. So it must be between 0 and 1. The parameter is often called beta in the literature.
  • "k": the base degree of each node. k must be greater than 2 and even.
  • "synchronized": is the graph and the species of vertices and edges synchronized?

Examples:

 
graph<myVertexSpecy,myEdgeSpecy> myGraph <- generate_watts_strogatz(
myVertexSpecy,
myEdgeSpecy,
2,
0.3,
2,
true);
graph<myVertexSpecy,myEdgeSpecy> myGraph <- generate_watts_strogatz(
myListOfNodes,
myEdgeSpecy,
0.3,
2,
true);

See also:

generate_barabasi_albert,


geojson_file

Possible use:

  • geojson_file (string) ---> file
  • string geojson_file int ---> file
  • geojson_file (string , int) ---> file
  • string geojson_file string ---> file
  • geojson_file (string , string) ---> file
  • string geojson_file bool ---> file
  • geojson_file (string , bool) ---> file
  • geojson_file (string, int, bool) ---> file
  • geojson_file (string, string, bool) ---> file

Result:

Constructs a file of type geojson. Allowed extensions are limited to json, geojson, geo.json

Special cases:

 
file f <- geojson_file("file.json");
  • geojson_file(string,int): This file constructor allows to read a geojson file and specifying the coordinates system code, as an int
 
file f <- geojson_file("file.json", 32648);
  • geojson_file(string,string): This file constructor allows to read a geojson file and specifying the coordinates system code (epg,...,), as a string
 
file f <- geojson_file("file.json", "EPSG:32648");
  • geojson_file(string,bool): This file constructor allows to read a geojson file and take a potential z value (not taken in account by default)
 
file f <- geojson_file("file.json", true);
  • geojson_file(string,int,bool): This file constructor allows to read a geojson file, specifying the coordinates system code, as an int and take a potential z value (not taken in account by default)
 
file f <- geojson_file("file.json",32648, true);
  • geojson_file(string,string,bool): This file constructor allows to read a geojson file, specifying the coordinates system code (epg,...,), as a string and take a potential z value (not taken in account by default
 
file f <- geojson_file("file.json", "EPSG:32648",true);

See also:

is_geojson,


geometric_mean

Possible use:

  • geometric_mean (container) ---> float

Result:

the geometric mean of the elements of the operand. See Geometric_mean for more details.

Comment:

The operator casts all the numerical element of the list into float. The elements that are not numerical are discarded.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- geometric_mean ([4.5, 3.5, 5.5, 7.0]); // var0 equals 4.962326343467649

See also:

mean, median, harmonic_mean,


geometry

Possible use:

  • geometry (any) ---> geometry

geometry_collection

Possible use:

  • geometry_collection (container<unknown,geometry>) ---> geometry

Result:

A geometry collection (multi-geometry) composed of the given list of geometries.

Special cases:

  • if the operand is nil, returns the point geometry {0,0}
  • if the operand is composed of a single geometry, returns a copy of the geometry.

Examples:

 
geometry var0 <- geometry_collection([{0,0}, {0,10}, {10,10}, {10,0}]); // var0 equals a geometry composed of the 4 points (multi-point).

See also:

around, circle, cone, link, norm, point, polygone, rectangle, square, triangle, line,


get

Possible use:

  • geometry get string ---> unknown
  • get (geometry , string) ---> unknown
  • agent get string ---> unknown
  • get (agent , string) ---> unknown

Result:

Reads an attribute of the specified geometry (left operand). The attribute name is specified by the right operand. Reads an attribute of the specified agent (left operand). The attribute name is specified by the right operand.

Special cases:

  • Reading the attribute of a geometry
 
string geom_area <- a_geometry get('area'); // reads then 'area' attribute of 'a_geometry' variable then assigns the returned value to the geom_area variable
  • Reading the attribute of another agent
 
string agent_name <- an_agent get('name'); // reads then 'name' attribute of an_agent then assigns the returned value to the agent_name variable

get_about

Possible use:

  • get_about (emotion) ---> predicate

Result:

get the about value of the given emotion

Examples:

 
get_about(emotion)


get_agent

Possible use:

  • get_agent (social_link) ---> agent

Result:

get the agent value of the given social link

Examples:

 
get_agent(social_link1)


get_agent_cause

Possible use:

  • get_agent_cause (predicate) ---> agent
  • get_agent_cause (emotion) ---> agent

Result:

evaluate the agent_cause value of a predicate get the agent cause value of the given emotion

Examples:

 
get_agent_cause(pred1)
get_agent_cause(emotion)


get_belief_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_belief_op predicate ---> mental_state
  • get_belief_op (agent , predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the belief in the belief base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_belief_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals nil


get_belief_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_belief_with_name_op string ---> mental_state
  • get_belief_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the belief in the belief base with the given name.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_belief_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals nil


get_beliefs_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_beliefs_op predicate ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_beliefs_op (agent , predicate) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the beliefs in the belief base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
get_beliefs_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_beliefs_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_beliefs_with_name_op string ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_beliefs_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the list of beliefs in the belief base which predicate has the given name.

Examples:

 
get_beliefs_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_current_intention_op

Possible use:

  • get_current_intention_op (agent) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the current intention.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_current_intention_op(self); // var0 equals nil


get_decay

Possible use:

  • get_decay (emotion) ---> float

Result:

get the decay value of the given emotion

Examples:

 
get_decay(emotion)


get_desire_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_desire_op predicate ---> mental_state
  • get_desire_op (agent , predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the desire in the desire base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_belief_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals nil


get_desire_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_desire_with_name_op string ---> mental_state
  • get_desire_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the desire in the desire base with the given name.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_desire_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals nil


get_desires_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_desires_op predicate ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_desires_op (agent , predicate) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the desires in the desire base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
get_desires_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_desires_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_desires_with_name_op string ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_desires_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the list of desires in the desire base which predicate has the given name.

Examples:

 
get_desires_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_dominance

Possible use:

  • get_dominance (social_link) ---> float

Result:

get the dominance value of the given social link

Examples:

 
get_dominance(social_link1)


get_familiarity

Possible use:

  • get_familiarity (social_link) ---> float

Result:

get the familiarity value of the given social link

Examples:

 
get_familiarity(social_link1)


get_ideal_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_ideal_op predicate ---> mental_state
  • get_ideal_op (agent , predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the ideal in the ideal base with the given name.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_ideal_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals nil


get_ideal_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_ideal_with_name_op string ---> mental_state
  • get_ideal_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the ideal in the ideal base with the given name.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_ideal_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals nil


get_ideals_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_ideals_op predicate ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_ideals_op (agent , predicate) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the ideal in the ideal base with the given name.

Examples:

 
get_ideals_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_ideals_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_ideals_with_name_op string ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_ideals_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the list of ideals in the ideal base which predicate has the given name.

Examples:

 
get_ideals_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_intensity

Possible use:

  • get_intensity (emotion) ---> float

Result:

get the intensity value of the given emotion

Examples:

 
get_intensity(emo1)


get_intention_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_intention_op predicate ---> mental_state
  • get_intention_op (agent , predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the intention in the intention base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
get_intention_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_intention_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_intention_with_name_op string ---> mental_state
  • get_intention_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the intention in the intention base with the given name.

Examples:

 
get_intention_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_intentions_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_intentions_op predicate ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_intentions_op (agent , predicate) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the intentions in the intention base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
get_intentions_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_intentions_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_intentions_with_name_op string ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_intentions_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the list of intentions in the intention base which predicate has the given name.

Examples:

 
get_intentions_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_lifetime

Possible use:

  • get_lifetime (mental_state) ---> int

Result:

get the lifetime value of the given mental state

Examples:

 
get_lifetime(mental_state1)


get_liking

Possible use:

  • get_liking (social_link) ---> float

Result:

get the liking value of the given social link

Examples:

 
get_liking(social_link1)


get_modality

Possible use:

  • get_modality (mental_state) ---> string

Result:

get the modality value of the given mental state

Examples:

 
get_modality(mental_state1)


get_obligation_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_obligation_op predicate ---> mental_state
  • get_obligation_op (agent , predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the obligation in the obligation base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_obligation_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals nil


get_obligation_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_obligation_with_name_op string ---> mental_state
  • get_obligation_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the obligation in the obligation base with the given name.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_obligation_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals nil


get_obligations_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_obligations_op predicate ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_obligations_op (agent , predicate) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the obligations in the obligation base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
get_obligations_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_obligations_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_obligations_with_name_op string ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_obligations_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the list of obligations in the obligation base which predicate has the given name.

Examples:

 
get_obligations_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_plan_name

Possible use:

  • get_plan_name (BDIPlan) ---> string

Result:

get the name of a given plan

Examples:

 
get_plan_name(agent.current_plan)


get_predicate

Possible use:

  • get_predicate (mental_state) ---> predicate

Result:

get the predicate value of the given mental state

Examples:

 
get_predicate(mental_state1)


get_solidarity

Possible use:

  • get_solidarity (social_link) ---> float

Result:

get the solidarity value of the given social link

Examples:

 
get_solidarity(social_link1)


get_strength

Possible use:

  • get_strength (mental_state) ---> float

Result:

get the strength value of the given mental state

Examples:

 
get_strength(mental_state1)


get_super_intention

Possible use:

  • get_super_intention (predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the super intention linked to a mental state

Examples:

 
get_super_intention(get_belief(pred1))


get_trust

Possible use:

  • get_trust (social_link) ---> float

Result:

get the familiarity value of the given social link

Examples:

 
get_familiarity(social_link1)


get_truth

Possible use:

  • get_truth (predicate) ---> bool

Result:

evaluate the truth value of a predicate

Examples:

 
get_truth(pred1)


get_uncertainties_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_uncertainties_op predicate ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_uncertainties_op (agent , predicate) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the uncertainties in the uncertainty base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
get_uncertainties_op(self,predicate("has_water"))


get_uncertainties_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_uncertainties_with_name_op string ---> list<mental_state>
  • get_uncertainties_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> list<mental_state>

Result:

get the list of uncertainties in the uncertainty base which predicate has the given name.

Examples:

 
get_uncertainties_with_name_op(self,"has_water")


get_uncertainty_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_uncertainty_op predicate ---> mental_state
  • get_uncertainty_op (agent , predicate) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the uncertainty in the uncertainty base with the given predicate.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_uncertainty_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals nil


get_uncertainty_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent get_uncertainty_with_name_op string ---> mental_state
  • get_uncertainty_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> mental_state

Result:

get the uncertainty in the uncertainty base with the given name.

Examples:

 
mental_state var0 <- get_uncertainty_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals nil


get_values

Possible use:

  • get_values (predicate) ---> map<string,unknown>

Result:

return the map values of a predicate

Examples:

 
get_values(pred1)


gif_file

Possible use:

  • gif_file (string) ---> file
  • string gif_file matrix<int> ---> file
  • gif_file (string , matrix<int>) ---> file

Result:

Constructs a file of type gif. Allowed extensions are limited to gif

Special cases:

  • gif_file(string): This file constructor allows to read a gif file
 
gif_file f <- gif_file("file.gif");
  • gif_file(string,matrix<int>): This file constructor allows to store a matrix in a gif file (it does not save it - just store it in memory)
 
gif_file f <- gif_file("file.gif",matrix([10,10],[10,10]));

See also:

is_gif,


gini

Possible use:

  • gini (list<float>) ---> float

Special cases:

  • return the Gini Index of the given list of values (list of floats)
 
float var0 <- gini([1.0, 0.5, 2.0]); // var0 equals the gini index computed i.e. 0.2857143

gml_file

Possible use:

  • gml_file (string) ---> file
  • string gml_file int ---> file
  • gml_file (string , int) ---> file
  • string gml_file string ---> file
  • gml_file (string , string) ---> file
  • string gml_file bool ---> file
  • gml_file (string , bool) ---> file
  • gml_file (string, int, bool) ---> file
  • gml_file (string, string, bool) ---> file

Result:

Constructs a file of type gml. Allowed extensions are limited to gml

Special cases:

  • gml_file(string): This file constructor allows to read a gml file
 
file f <- gml_file("file.gml");
  • gml_file(string,int): This file constructor allows to read a gml file and specifying the coordinates system code, as an int (epsg code)
 
file f <- gml_file("file.gml", 32648);
  • gml_file(string,string): This file constructor allows to read a gml file and specifying the coordinates system code (epg,...,), as a string
 
file f <- gml_file("file.gml", "EPSG:32648");
  • gml_file(string,bool): This file constructor allows to read a gml file and take a potential z value (not taken in account by default)
 
file f <- gml_file("file.gml", true);
  • gml_file(string,int,bool): This file constructor allows to read a gml file, specifying the coordinates system code, as an int (epsg code) and take a potential z value (not taken in account by default)
 
file f <- gml_file("file.gml", 32648, true);
  • gml_file(string,string,bool): This file constructor allows to read a gml file, specifying the coordinates system code (epg,...,), as a string and take a potential z value (not taken in account by default
 
file f <- gml_file("file.gml", "EPSG:32648",true);

See also:

is_gml,


graph

Possible use:

  • graph (any) ---> graph

grayscale

Possible use:

  • grayscale (rgb) ---> rgb

Result:

Converts rgb color to grayscale value

Comment:

r=red, g=green, b=blue. Between 0 and 255 and gray = 0.299 * red + 0.587 * green + 0.114 * blue (Photoshop value)

Examples:

 
rgb var0 <- grayscale (rgb(255,0,0)); // var0 equals to a dark grey

See also:

rgb, hsb,


grid_at

Possible use:

  • species grid_at point ---> agent
  • grid_at (species , point) ---> agent

Result:

returns the cell of the grid (right-hand operand) at the position given by the right-hand operand

Comment:

If the left-hand operand is a point of floats, it is used as a point of ints.

Special cases:

  • if the left-hand operand is not a grid cell species, returns nil

Examples:

 
agent var0 <- grid_cell grid_at {1,2}; // var0 equals the agent grid_cell with grid_x=1 and grid_y = 2


grid_cells_to_graph

Possible use:

  • grid_cells_to_graph (container) ---> graph
  • container grid_cells_to_graph species ---> graph
  • grid_cells_to_graph (container , species) ---> graph

Result:

creates a graph from a list of cells (operand). An edge is created between neighbors.

Examples:

 
my_cell_graph<-grid_cells_to_graph(cells_list)

See also:

as_intersection_graph, as_edge_graph,


grid_file

Possible use:

  • grid_file (string) ---> file
  • string grid_file int ---> file
  • grid_file (string , int) ---> file
  • string grid_file string ---> file
  • grid_file (string , string) ---> file

Result:

Constructs a file of type grid. Allowed extensions are limited to asc, tif

Special cases:

  • grid_file(string): This file constructor allows to read a asc file or a tif (geotif) file
 
file f <- grid_file("file.asc");
  • grid_file(string,int): This file constructor allows to read a asc file or a tif (geotif) file specifying the coordinates system code, as an int (epsg code)
 
file f <- grid_file("file.asc", 32648);
  • grid_file(string,string): This file constructor allows to read a asc file or a tif (geotif) file specifying the coordinates system code (epg,...,), as a string
 
file f <- grid_file("file.asc","EPSG:32648");

See also:

is_grid,


group_by

Possible use:

  • container group_by any expression ---> map
  • group_by (container , any expression) ---> map

Result:

Returns a map, where the keys take the possible values of the right-hand operand and the map values are the list of elements of the left-hand operand associated to the key value

Comment:

in the right-hand operand, the keyword each can be used to represent, in turn, each of the right-hand operand elements.

Special cases:

  • if the left-hand operand is nil, group_by throws an error

Examples:

 
map var0 <- [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] group_by (each > 3); // var0 equals [false::[1, 2, 3], true::[4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]
map var1 <- g2 group_by (length(g2 out_edges_of each) ); // var1 equals [ 0::[node9, node7, node10, node8, node11], 1::[node6], 2::[node5], 3::[node4]]
map var2 <- (list(node) group_by (round(node(each).location.x)); // var2 equals [32::[node5], 21::[node1], 4::[node0], 66::[node2], 96::[node3]]
map<bool,list> var3 <- [1::2, 3::4, 5::6] group_by (each > 4); // var3 equals [false::[2, 4], true::[6]]

See also:

first_with, last_with, where,


harmonic_mean

Possible use:

  • harmonic_mean (container) ---> float

Result:

the harmonic mean of the elements of the operand. See Harmonic_mean for more details.

Comment:

The operator casts all the numerical element of the list into float. The elements that are not numerical are discarded.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- harmonic_mean ([4.5, 3.5, 5.5, 7.0]); // var0 equals 4.804159445407279

See also:

mean, median, geometric_mean,


has_belief_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_belief_op predicate ---> bool
  • has_belief_op (agent , predicate) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is a belief about the given predicate.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_belief_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals false


has_belief_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_belief_with_name_op string ---> bool
  • has_belief_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is a belief about the given name.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_belief_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals false


has_desire_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_desire_op predicate ---> bool
  • has_desire_op (agent , predicate) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is a desire about the given predicate.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_desire_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals false


has_desire_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_desire_with_name_op string ---> bool
  • has_desire_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is a desire about the given name.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_desire_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals false


has_ideal_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_ideal_op predicate ---> bool
  • has_ideal_op (agent , predicate) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an ideal about the given predicate.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_ideal_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals false


has_ideal_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_ideal_with_name_op string ---> bool
  • has_ideal_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an ideal about the given name.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_ideal_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals false


has_intention_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_intention_op predicate ---> bool
  • has_intention_op (agent , predicate) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an intention about the given predicate.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_intention_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals false


has_intention_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_intention_with_name_op string ---> bool
  • has_intention_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an intention about the given name.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_intention_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals false


has_obligation_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_obligation_op predicate ---> bool
  • has_obligation_op (agent , predicate) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an obligation about the given predicate.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_obligation_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals false


has_obligation_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_obligation_with_name_op string ---> bool
  • has_obligation_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an obligation about the given name.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_obligation_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals false


has_uncertainty_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_uncertainty_op predicate ---> bool
  • has_uncertainty_op (agent , predicate) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an uncertainty about the given predicate.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_uncertainty_op(self,predicate("has_water")); // var0 equals false


has_uncertainty_with_name_op

Possible use:

  • agent has_uncertainty_with_name_op string ---> bool
  • has_uncertainty_with_name_op (agent , string) ---> bool

Result:

indicates if there already is an uncertainty about the given name.

Examples:

 
bool var0 <- has_uncertainty_with_name_op(self,"has_water"); // var0 equals false


hexagon

Possible use:

  • hexagon (float) ---> geometry
  • hexagon (point) ---> geometry
  • float hexagon float ---> geometry
  • hexagon (float , float) ---> geometry

Result:

A hexagon geometry which the given with and height

Comment:

the center of the hexagon is by default the location of the current agent in which has been called this operator.the center of the hexagon is by default the location of the current agent in which has been called this operator.the center of the hexagon is by default the location of the current agent in which has been called this operator.

Special cases:

  • returns nil if the operand is nil.
  • returns nil if the operand is nil.
  • returns nil if the operand is nil.

Examples:

 
geometry var0 <- hexagon(10); // var0 equals a geometry as a hexagon of width of 10 and height of 10.
geometry var1 <- hexagon({10,5}); // var1 equals a geometry as a hexagon of width of 10 and height of 5.
geometry var2 <- hexagon(10,5); // var2 equals a geometry as a hexagon of width of 10 and height of 5.

See also:

around, circle, cone, line, link, norm, point, polygon, polyline, rectangle, triangle,


hierarchical_clustering

Possible use:

  • container<unknown,agent> hierarchical_clustering float ---> list
  • hierarchical_clustering (container<unknown,agent> , float) ---> list

Result:

A tree (list of list) contained groups of agents clustered by distance considering a distance min between two groups.

Comment:

use of hierarchical clustering with Minimum for linkage criterion between two groups of agents.

Examples:

 
list var0 <- [ag1, ag2, ag3, ag4, ag5] hierarchical_clustering 20.0; // var0 equals for example, can return [[[ag1],[ag3]], [ag2], [[[ag4],[ag5]],[ag6]]

See also:

simple_clustering_by_distance,


horizontal

Possible use:

  • horizontal (map<unknown,int>) ---> unknown<string>

hsb

Possible use:

  • hsb (float, float, float) ---> rgb
  • hsb (float, float, float, int) ---> rgb
  • hsb (float, float, float, float) ---> rgb

Result:

Converts hsb (h=hue, s=saturation, b=brightness) value to Gama color

Comment:

h,s and b components should be floating-point values between 0.0 and 1.0 and when used alpha should be an integer (between 0 and 255) or a float (between 0 and 1) . Examples: Red=(0.0,1.0,1.0), Yellow=(0.16,1.0,1.0), Green=(0.33,1.0,1.0), Cyan=(0.5,1.0,1.0), Blue=(0.66,1.0,1.0), Magenta=(0.83,1.0,1.0)

Examples:

 
rgb var0 <- hsb (0.5,1.0,1.0,0.0); // var0 equals rgb("cyan",0)
rgb var1 <- hsb (0.0,1.0,1.0); // var1 equals rgb("red")

See also:

rgb,


hypot

Possible use:

  • hypot (float, float, float, float) ---> float

Result:

Returns sqrt(x2 +y2) without intermediate overflow or underflow.

Special cases:

  • If either argument is infinite, then the result is positive infinity. If either argument is NaN and neither argument is infinite, then the result is NaN.

Examples:

 
float var0 <- hypot(0,1,0,1); // var0 equals sqrt(2)